The Book

Many visitors of our homepage already asked themselves, where our whole investigations are to lead. We collected over 5 years material and interviewed eyewitnesses. At the end we shall publish a book - it's finished now in the German version and the title is:

 

The German version of our book (German title: Alarm! Die Panzerspitze kommt!) is finished and was officially published on 29 march 2008 in Gemünden at the historical Huttenschloss.

The book can be bought since 31. March 2008. As we are no booksellers, we can provide you with two sources for the German version:

 

"Alarm! die Panzerspitze kommt!" 

ISBN 978-3-932737-07-7

 

Druckerei Bürobedarf G. H. Hofmann

Inh. Jürgen Sommerer 

Bahnhofstraße. 27

97737 Gemünden

Telefon: (09351) 3237

 

or internet: www.hofmann-buch.de

The English version is under translation and we hope to get it finished in 2009. If you click on the German book title below, a 30 page German reading example will open.

Alarm! die Panzerspitze kommt!!!

Translated reading examples from the German version:

... While the commanders were being briefed about the mission, the first rumors reached the soldiers in the assigned units. Private Andy J. Clark was eighteen years old and was a replacement, who joined A Company, 10th Armored Infantry Battalion on 22 March 1945. After his squad had spent the night on a hill near Schweinheim, they returned to their halftrack. There he was ordered by his Sergeant to get some rifle grenades. Andy Clark walked along the long column of parked vehicles, and after an hour he returned -- nobody had a rifle grenade to give him. When he returned his Sergeant laughed at him and said: "Guess what sonny! You just have volunteered for a suicide mission!" ...

... Elements of Headquarters Company's Reconnaissance Platoons were also assigned to the Task Force.  The platoon leader, Ist Lieutenant Norman Hoffner, went along with three of his squads. The reconnaissance squad had a Jeep with a .30 cal. machine gun. Some of the Jeeps were also fitted with steel plates as protection against small arms fire. The squad consisted of three soldiers who were under the command of a Corporal or Sergeant. Lieutenant Hoffner had been a squad leader in this platoon before he received a battlefield commission.  Another member of the platoon was Private Irvin Solotoff, whose mother language was German.  He was assigned to Captain Baum as an interpreter and did not want to go on this mission. "It was planned that the 4th Armored Division should have a rest, then we received orders for this mission. We had been in continuous combat for three months and some of my comrades were angry about the new orders. We were told not to take along any souvenirs. I had some things of value in my Jeep, three German cameras, which I gave to a buddy to keep for me. His name was Cavanaugh and I have never seen him or my things again. ...

 ... Twentyseven year old German Paratrooper Lieutenant Hans Gutbell and his young wife, didn't know about what should come, when they rode with their bicycles from Fellen towards Burgsinn. They got married on 25 March 1945 in Oberursel near Frankfurt. In order to be married, he received leave from his Parachute Artillery Battalion in Northern Italy. When Hans Gutbell arrived at Oberursel, he didn't expect the Americans to be so close to Frankfurt. After the ceremony, the couple packed their stuff on two bicycles and headed for Bad Kissingen for their honeymoon. Under the continuous threat of Allied fighter bombers, who swept the country road, they finally reached Bad Orb. As they could not find any accommodation there, they spend the night under the open sky in a ditch. The next morning the woke up early and continued their journey towards Burgsinn. When they entered the town, they wondered about the many white bed sheets, hanging out the windows along the Fellen road. Hans Gutbell thought, the people here must be having a big washing day. In the center of town, they asked a local civilian for the route towards Bad Kissingen. The man was very upset and answered, that the shortest way would be via Gemuenden. But they couldn't go this way, because an American armored column coming from this direction. Now the Gutbells were also concerned, they couldn't believe the sere Americans so deep in the backcountry. The man advised them to move to the railroad crossing and then up hill on the "Red trail". On this route they could travel along the ridge to Gräfendorf and then reach Hammelburg without danger. ...

... Lieutenant Nutto´s tank was the lead vehicle, the others followed in a distance. At the edge of Hoellrich, the driver immediately stopped the tank, because it crashed almost into a German road block, which was set up between two houses. Suddenly he heard a dull "FUMMP" and could see the Panzerfaust projectile flying towards his tank. The projectile hit the turret a foot below the top of the roof. The driver, who looked out his hatch was killed immediately. The explosion was not very loud. Lieutenant Nutto was pushed out of the commanders cupola by the gunner and landed on the road. He felt like to be kicked by a mule. He was wounded and had a shock. At least one other crew member was killed too, because he landed beside a motionless body. A little while German soldiers came closer to the tank. One German Officer cadets clambered into the drivers compartment, started the tank and drove in from the road into an orchard near route 27. A German officer asked him, if he is a Negro - Nutto´s face was black all over. Later he was brought in a stable to receive medical care. ...

... When arrived in Bonnland, Captain Eggemann phoned to Captain Rose at the Reussenburg OP. Rose told him, that the enemy Task Force had come from Hessdorf, about three hours ago and assembled around the Reussenberg Farm. He estimated the strength about 6 tanks, and 25 halftracks. With this situation report, Captain Eggemann decided to make a frontal attack at once. He ordered Lientenant Demmel to deploy a raiding patrol, to attack along the road from the Northern Camp towards the Reussenberg. The raiding patrol had to prevent enemy outbreak towards Camp Hammelburg. Further Lieutenant Demmel had to deploy to strong anti-tank squads at the northern road intersections. The mission was to attack from the north in case the main attack would fail. Lieutenant Demmel had to lead two strong companies as reserve near the command post of Colonel Hoppe. Captain Eggemann and Captain Köhl accompanied by Lieutenant Hülsken, Commpany Commander of the Tank Destroyer Company, moved after the briefing to the east side of the Michelsberg, north of Bonnland. Both Tank Destroyer Officers were briefed as to the enemy situation. Captain Eggemann reconnoitered with them the best positions for the tank destroyers. Captain Eggemann´s attack plan was to assemble the tank destroyers on the east side of the Michelsberg. Further he wanted a barrage from all weapons on the enemy position. After the barrage, the tank destroyers were to advance with accompanying infantry. They had to intercept all attempts of the Americans to break out. After the break in, they had to take the Americans as prisoners. ...

... The Germans begun to capture the Americans. PFC Milton Koshiol, saw that he would have no chance and surrendered. They were captured and lined up with those men, they just had liberated. A young German soldier searched him. He opened his field jacket and discovered a German Army decoration which had been pinned inside. PFC Koshiol was shocked because in this chaos, he had forgotten to throw it away. When the German soldier saw the decoration, he took a deep glance into Milton Koshiol´s eyes. He blood freeze - the glance of the soldier seemed for him like eternity. "Now he shall kill me!" - he thought. But the German soldier closed his jacket again and pushed him to a captured half rack. Milton Koshiol will never forget this German soldiers, he was so thankful that he saved his live. ...

... Leo Döll remembers a captured US tank crew, which was found by farmers in the forest. They brought them to a Waffen-SS unit which camped outside Weickersgrüben. The farmers were on their fields when they had found them. The Americans were captured without resistance by the farmers with dunk forks. First they were put in the garage of the local fire department. The towns people were forbidden by the local NAZI-party leader to give those starved men  any food . The garage had a little window and the German children supplied them with apples and bread. Later the prisoners had to help finish the half built road block. ...

2005 © Copyright Peter Domes -  Date of last change: 2012-07-09